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StoneWolf

Books 'n Stuff

Currently reading

A Dance with Dragons: A Song of Ice and Fire: Book Five
George R.R. Martin
Progress: 18/1051 pages

Reading progress update: I've read 55%.

Armor - John Steakley

Well after getting about halfway through this book, I've kinda centered on the notion that the author wanted it to be just like Vonneguts 'Slaughterhouse V'. the problem with that comparison is that I've never actually read Slaughterhouse V and I'm basing said notion off reviews and summaries of the book. I think I will put it on the list to read next as it is a classic and I want to know if the comparison is accurate.

 

As for Armor itself, its a good study in the minds ability to cope, to protect itself, to keep hanging on. Some of the characters are deeper than others, while some are more archetypal with a bit of hidden detail. However, with the deeper exploration there is still much left wanting. The author (John Steakley) isn't very descriptive at all with his surroundings or his characters, except where it serves that deeper meaning within the book. For example, the planet Sanction, one of the prime locations of the book, is given little description mentioning that it had tree's and plants, but no birds or fish (due to a local planetary disease). Later on its mentioned that it is an 'earthlike planet', but this is pretty much all we get. The character of Jack Crow can easily be summed up, probably just from looking at the name; he's a rogue, a thief, a betrayer, and a powderkeg all of legendary status (well ok we do find out a little more about him midway through). Very, very little (so far at least) has been explained about his background, history or appearance. As usual the reader is left to fill in the details for themselves.

 

I will update this and post a full review (if my view of the book changes), however its fair to say that author appears to have written half a good book and left the other half to rot. I wonder if the publisher had originally imposed a page limit for the author. This would account for the book's half written feel.